News

Weatherwatch: Meteosat-10 launched to track weather systems

Weatherwatch: Meteosat-10 launched to track weather systems

The Guardian, 15 July 2012
www.guardian.co.uk/news/2012/jul/15/weatherwatch-satellite-meteosat-data

Kate Ravilious looks at how satellite data has transformed weather forecasting

READ ARTICLE AT The Guardian

Weatherwatch: I hear Thunder, Oh don’t you? Pitter patter raindrops

Weatherwatch: I hear Thunder, Oh don’t you? Pitter patter raindrops

The Guardian, 29 June 2012
www.guardian.co.uk/news/2012/jun/29/weatherwatch-thunderstorms-euro2012-floods

Kate Ravilious on how thunderstorms remind us the weather is beyond our control

READ ARTICLE AT The Guardian

From forestry to geoengineering, silicate weathering counts

Environmental Research Web, 27 June 2012
environmentalresearchweb.org/cws/article/news/50085

Watch out for rocks. From harvesting trees to growing crops – or even geoengineering the Earth’s climate – many of our activities have an intimate relationship with the weathering of the Earth’s crust. Now research shows how important it is to obtain good estimates of local rock-weathering rates if we are to avoid upsetting these finely balanced natural cycles.

READ ARTICLE AT Environmental Research Web

Weatherwatch: Those clouds that ‘float on high o’er vales and hills’

Weatherwatch: Those clouds that ‘float on high o’er vales and hills’

The Guardian, 17 June 2012
www.guardian.co.uk/news/2012/jun/17/weatherwatch-clouds-wordsworth-cumulus?INTCMP=SRCH

Kate Ravilious says June’s skies have been dominated by stratus clouds rather than cumulus clouds

READ ARTICLE AT The Guardian

Centralized wastewater treatment in California wins on energy efficiency

Environmental Research Web, 7 June 2012
environmentalresearchweb.org/cws/article/news/49866

Flush the toilet and you send around 9 litres of water down the drain. Having a shower adds another 30 litres or so, while a steaming bath contributes around 80 litres. In total the average person in the UK gets through around 150 litres of water every day. But where does all this water go and what is the environmental impact of flushing it all away?

READ ARTICLE AT Environmental Research Web

Reversing proves a tricky manoeuvre

Environmental Research Web, 22 May 2012
environmentalresearchweb.org/cws/article/news/49667

What do climate change and rubber bands have in common? A new modelling study shows that many Earth systems behave like rubber bands, by not reversing smoothly down the same path that they were stretched along. This means that many of the changes brought about by global warming, such as sea-level rise and drought, will persist for some time even if we manage to reduce atmospheric CO2.

READ ARTICLE AT Environmental Research Web

Weatherwatch: When Swallows fly high, the weather will be dry

Weatherwatch: When Swallows fly high, the weather will be dry

The Guardian, 20 May 2012
www.guardian.co.uk/news/2012/may/20/weatherwatch-birdwatching-swallows-folklore

Kate Ravilious looks at the truths of weather folklore

READ ARTICLE AT The Guardian

Why is the black crowberry heading north?

Environmental Research Web, 3 May 2012
environmentalresearchweb.org/cws/article/news/49509

Warmer temperatures in the future are predicted to make many northern hemisphere plants march northwards. For some plant species, such as the “black crowberry”, this northward migration appears to have already begun; but is the movement really due to climate change? New research suggests that rising temperatures cannot explain it all.

READ ARTICLE AT Environmental Research Web

Weatherwatch: Making a splash for umbrella manufacturers

Weatherwatch: Making a splash for umbrella manufacturers

The Guardian, 29 April 2012
www.guardian.co.uk/news/2012/apr/29/weatherwatch-april-showers-rainfall

Kate Ravilious looks at the tradition of April showers

READ ARTICLE AT The Guardian

Development, pollution and dredging threaten seagrass more than climate change

Environmental Research Web, 27 April 2012
environmentalresearchweb.org/cws/article/news/49419

Seagrass: it might not sound very exciting, but according to experts these extensive marine flowering plants form the basis of one of the most productive ecosystems on Earth. In recent decades seagrass habitats have come under threat, from anthropogenic activities and climate change, and currently there is little consensus about which threats are causing the greatest damage. Now a study has pooled knowledge to create a resource to inform management of this valuable natural habitat.

READ ARTICLE AT Environmental Research Web

Kalahari Desert could dust up Southern Ocean

Environmental Research Web, 26 April 2012
environmentalresearchweb.org/cws/article/news/49404

Take a deep breath. If you live in the northern hemisphere then you will have inhaled a fair amount of dust. If you live in the southern hemisphere that breath was relatively dust free. However, new research indicates that the southern hemisphere is set to become dustier, as the South-African Kalahari Desert starts to erode. Ultimately, this additional airborne sand may breathe new life into ocean ecosystems.

READ ARTICLE AT Environmental Research Web

Weatherwatch: Wind delayed first woman’s flight across channel

Weatherwatch: Wind delayed first woman’s flight across channel

The Guardian, 15 April 2012
www.guardian.co.uk/news/2012/apr/15/weatherwatch-aviation-history-flight

Kate Ravilious looks at the adventurous life of Harriet Quimby

READ ARTICLE AT The Guardian

Weatherwatch: What is behind this summer in March?

Weatherwatch: What is behind this summer in March?

The Guardian, 30 March 2012
www.guardian.co.uk/news/2012/mar/30/weatherwatch-summer-march-temperatures

Kate Ravilious says a strong ridge of high pressure is the cause of high temperatures

READ ARTICLE AT The Guardian

Weatherwatch: March sometimes has a sting in its tail

Weatherwatch: March sometimes has a sting in its tail

The Guardian, 18 March 2012
www.guardian.co.uk/news/2012/mar/18/weatherwatch-masts-winter-transmitters

Kate Ravilious looks at a TV mast which withstood the worst of British weather

READ ARTICLE AT The Guardian

Mystery booms: The source of a worldwide sonic enigma

Mystery booms: The source of a worldwide sonic enigma

New Scientist, 23 February 2012
www.newscientist.com/article/mg21328522.300-mystery-booms-the-source-of-a-worldwide-sonic-enigma.html

Every so often, a loud booming noise is heard from over the horizon without any obvious explanation. What on Earth could the culprit be?

READ ARTICLE AT New Scientist

Weatherwatch: Dirty glaciers melt faster than clean glaciers

Weatherwatch: Dirty glaciers melt faster than clean glaciers

The Guardian, 19 February 2012
www.guardian.co.uk/news/2012/feb/19/weatherwatch-glaciers-environment-pollution

Kate Ravilious focuses on the environmental findings of concentrated dirt

READ ARTICLE AT The Guardian

“No time to waste” on transition to green energy

Environmental Research Web, 16 February 2012
environmentalresearchweb.org/cws/article/news/48649

If the entire world adopted ‘green’ forms of energy tomorrow, how long would it take for global temperatures to stabilize? The answer is a good 50 years: even if we “pull out all of the stops” there is little we can do to diminish the impact of climate change during the first half of this century. But choosing to adopt the right technologies now should stabilize the climate by the second half of the century, according to a new study.

READ ARTICLE AT Environmental Research Web

Top discoveries of 2011: Viking Boat Burial – Ardnamurchan, Scotland

Top discoveries of 2011: Viking Boat Burial – Ardnamurchan, Scotland

Archaeology Magazine, 31 January 2012
www.archaeology.org/1201/features/topten_scotland.html

A spectacular Viking boat burial was uncovered this year on the coast of Ardnamurchan, a remote region of western Scotland, the first such burial to be found on the British mainland. The Viking, who is thought to have perished over 1,000 years ago, was most likely a high-ranking warrior.

READ ARTICLE AT Archaeology Magazine

Are China’s greens set to turn to brown?

Environmental Research Web, 30 January 2012
environmentalresearchweb.org/cws/article/news/48483

China has become greener in recent decades. Since the 1980s trees, shrubs and grasses have been flourishing, thanks to warmer temperatures, a longer growing season and plenty of rain. But now research shows that this beneficial trend appears to be tailing off, with drought stress predominant in some areas. If the warmer, drier trend continues then China’s lush green appearance may start turning to parched brown.

READ ARTICLE AT Environmental Research Web

Weatherwatch: Winters in northern hemisphere set to get colder

Weatherwatch: Winters in northern hemisphere set to get colder

The Guardian, 22 January 2012
www.guardian.co.uk/news/2012/jan/22/weatherwatch-global-warming-climate-change

Kate Ravilious examines recent findings on global temperature changes

READ ARTICLE AT The Guardian

Global warming set to bring colder, snowier winters

Environmental Research Web, 13 January 2012
environmentalresearchweb.org/cws/article/news/48293

The world is getting warmer, which should mean warmer winters – right? Wrong – a new study shows that global warming produces colder winters and heavier dumps of snow for large swathes of the northern hemisphere.

READ ARTICLE AT Environmental Research Web

Weatherwatch: The Föhn effect and winter warmth in Wales

Weatherwatch: The Föhn effect and winter warmth in Wales

The Gaurdian, 4 January 2012
www.guardian.co.uk/news/2012/jan/04/weatherwatch-wales-fohn-warm

Fancy basking in temperatures of 17C or so in January? Winter breaks to the Canary Isles are one way of achieving this, but relocating to Britain’s “hot-spots” could also give you a few more balmy winter days.

READ ARTICLE AT The Gaurdian